Wearable sensors to challenge arm and hand use after stroke

janice-eng

Wearable sensors to challenge arm and hand use after stroke

Despite the ability to move the upper extremity, many individuals with stroke do not go on to use their stroke-affected arm and hand for daily activities.  Motor or functional ability does not necessarily provide an estimate of how much the affected upper extremity is used in daily life.  Recently wearable devices such as wrist accelerometers have been used to measure the extent and intensity of upper extremity movements in the home and community setting. This session will provide an overview of the use of wrist accelerometers to provide a reliable and objective way to assess real-world upper extremity use in individuals with stroke.  In addition, the development and validation of a new wearable sensor based on force myography will be presented.  This new device detects force myographic signals at the wrist using an innovative wrist band consisting of smart materials to capture arm movements, as well as hand grasp and release.  We anticipate that this wearable device will enable clinicians to monitor the upper limb activity of their patients during their therapy sessions in the clinic or during daily activity in the home setting, and motivate them to reach prescribed daily activity targets after stroke.  Lastly, the integration of wearable sensors into a program to improve upper extremity recovery using a self-management framework will be described.   Wearable sensors provide one solution to motivating and monitoring patients in rehabilitation without additional supervision.